The Tragic Life & Death of Reverend Alexander Gordon’s Second Wife

When Margaret Martin married the Reverend Alexander Gordon, she probably didn’t know what she was getting into. Gordon’s first wife had died, and left behind two children for his second wife to raise. Gordon wasted no time getting his second wife, a young parishioner in his congregation, pregnant. Since the Margaret’s first baby was a girl and Gordon did not have any girls, they named her after his first wife. Between 1824 and 1832, Margaret gave birth to five children, bringing the size of her family to nine. The family was poor. Gordon never earned more than $200 a year. Continue reading “The Tragic Life & Death of Reverend Alexander Gordon’s Second Wife”

Burning Slaves at the Stake in the Mohawk Valley (History)

By Daniel T. Weaver

The sentence of the five man court was that the prisoner “be carried to the place from whence she came + to be brot from there to the Place of Execution and there be burnt till she is dead.” The five Tryon (later Montgomery) County, New York justices were Jelles Fonda, (ancestor of Jane, Henry, Peter and Bridget), Adam Loucks (later a Stone Arabia tavern keeper), John Butler (notorious Tory raider during the Revolution), Joseph Chew (his son was Sir William Johnson’s god-child) and Peter Masten, Continue reading “Burning Slaves at the Stake in the Mohawk Valley (History)”

Lord & Tailor: Sir William Johnson and his Clothier (History)

While wealthier residents of colonial Johnstown, New York afforded custom tailoring, almost everyone else wore clothing that itched, chafed, bagged up, or was too hot in summer and not warm enough in winter. Settler’s clothing mostly derived from sheering their sheep, spinning the wool into cloth, and sewing that into ill-fitting, patched breeches and shirts. Meanwhile, the Johnson family quartet – Sir William Johnson, Sir John Johnson, Guy Johnson and Daniel Claus – plus others of wealth and prominence, enjoyed clothing that actually fitted and was reasonably comfortable, being ‘tailor-made.’ Good tailoring has always been appreciated by those who can afford it and envied by those who can’t. Continue reading “Lord & Tailor: Sir William Johnson and his Clothier (History)”

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