Attacks on Congressional Candidate Liz Joy Uncalled For

I have observed often that people who preach tolerance and want it for themselves are often intolerant. Take the case of Thomas Hurd-Toften. Hurd-Toften is a resident of the Town of Root. A couple of years ago, he and his boyfriend applied for a marriage license from the town clerk, Laurel “Sherrie” Eriksen. The two men alleged that Eriksen refused to grant them a license. Subsequently they sued the Town of Root, and the town settled with them for $25,000. Continue reading “Attacks on Congressional Candidate Liz Joy Uncalled For”

Governor Cuomo’s and Congressman Tonko’s Response to Violence Lacking Vigor

Daniel T. Weaver

While there has been nearly universal condemnation of the murder by a cop of George Floyd in Minneapolis, democrats and liberals have been slow to condemn the violence of rioters, looters and arsonists. When they do condemn, their condemnation is often insipid. Governor Andrew Cuomo’s and Congressman Paul Tonko’s condemnation of violence by rioters and anarchists are examples of too little, too late. They have been more concerned about condemning President Trump than they have been about condemning violence. Continue reading “Governor Cuomo’s and Congressman Tonko’s Response to Violence Lacking Vigor”

The Cop Who Dared Ticket A NYS Gov

By Daniel T. Weaver

Around 11:50 a.m. July 26, 1912 City of Amsterdam police officer, Charles A. Davis, spotted a touring car tearing down East Main Street at nearly 30 mph. He pursued the vehicle on his Indian motorcycle, overtook it on Guy Park Avenue and notified the driver he was under arrest for speeding. In 1912 speed limits were so low that driving in excess of 30 mph for more than a quarter mile was presumptive evidence of reckless driving. The speed limit within the city at the time was 15 mph. Continue reading “The Cop Who Dared Ticket A NYS Gov”

World Series Key to Understanding Electoral College (Politics)

To what should we liken the Electoral College? How about another favorite American pastime—baseball’s world series. Because of the Electoral College, the presidential election is different than all other elections in the United States. Other elections are like a single baseball game in which the winner is the team which scores the most runs. But the presidential race is more like the world series. The baseball team that wins the world series does so not by making the most runs in the series but by winning the most games. The winning presidential candidate does not win by receiving the most individual votes (runs) but by winning the best of 50 games (states). Continue reading “World Series Key to Understanding Electoral College (Politics)”

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑